Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

had intended to be quietly dignified, but he was in a smouldering rage 

from the beginning, and began by assuming, which alone was more than 

flesh and blood could stand, that the insurrection was over and that she 

was coming home submissively. In his desire to be emphatic and to avenge 

himself for his over-night distresses, he speedily became brutal, more 

brutal than she had ever known him before. 

 

"A nice time of anxiety you've given me, young lady," he said, as he 

entered the room. "I hope you're satisfied." 

 

She was frightened--his anger always did frighten her--and in her 

resolve to conceal her fright she carried a queen-like dignity to what 

she felt even at the time was a preposterous pitch. She said she hoped 

she had not distressed him by the course she had felt obliged to take, 

and he told her not to be a fool. She tried to keep her side up by 

declaring that he had put her into an impossible position, and he 

replied by shouting, "Nonsense! Nonsense! Any father in my place would 

have done what I did." 

 

Then he went on to say: "Well, you've had your little adventure, and I 

hope now you've had enough of it. So go up-stairs and get your things 

together while I look out for a hansom." 

 

To which the only possible reply seemed to be, "I'm not coming home." 

 

"Not coming home!" 

 

"No!" And, in spite of her resolve to be a Person, Ann Veronica began 

to weep with terror at herself. Apparently she was always doomed to weep 

when she talked to her father. But he was always forcing her to say and 

do such unexpectedly conclusive things. She feared he might take her 

tears as a sign of weakness. So she said: "I won't come home. I'd rather 

starve!" 

 

For a moment the conversation hung upon that declaration. Then Mr. 

Stanley, putting his hands on the table in the manner rather of a 

barrister than a solicitor, and regarding her balefully through his 

glasses with quite undisguised animosity, asked, "And may I presume to 

inquire, then, what you mean to do?--how do you propose to live?" 

 

"I shall live," sobbed Ann Veronica. "You needn't be anxious about that! 

I shall contrive to live." 

 

"But I AM anxious," said Mr. Stanley, "I am anxious. Do you think it's 

nothing to me to have my daughter running about London looking for odd 

jobs and disgracing herself?" 

 

"Sha'n't get odd jobs," said Ann Veronica, wiping her eyes. 

 

And from that point they went on to a thoroughly embittering wrangle. 


Page 4 from 7:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   Forward