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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"I don't think I CAN do that," she said. She looked up and said, a 

little breathlessly, "I'm sorry, aunt, but I don't think I can." 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

Then it was the expostulations really began. 

 

From first to last, on this occasion, her aunt expostulated for about 

two hours. "But, my dear," she began, "it is Impossible! It is quite out 

of the Question. You simply can't." And to that, through vast rhetorical 

meanderings, she clung. It reached her only slowly that Ann Veronica was 

standing to her resolution. "How will you live?" she appealed. "Think 

of what people will say!" That became a refrain. "Think of what Lady 

Palsworthy will say! Think of what"--So-and-so--"will say! What are we 

to tell people? 

 

"Besides, what am I to tell your father?" 

 

At first it had not been at all clear to Ann Veronica that she would 

refuse to return home; she had had some dream of a capitulation that 

should leave her an enlarged and defined freedom, but as her aunt put 

this aspect and that of her flight to her, as she wandered illogically 

and inconsistently from one urgent consideration to another, as she 

mingled assurances and aspects and emotions, it became clearer and 

clearer to the girl that there could be little or no change in the 

position of things if she returned. "And what will Mr. Manning think?" 

said her aunt. 

 

"I don't care what any one thinks," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"I can't imagine what has come over you," said her aunt. "I can't 

conceive what you want. You foolish girl!" 

 

Ann Veronica took that in silence. At the back of her mind, dim and yet 

disconcerting, was the perception that she herself did not know what she 

wanted. And yet she knew it was not fair to call her a foolish girl. 

 

"Don't you care for Mr. Manning?" said her aunt. 

 

"I don't see what he has to do with my coming to London?" 

 

"He--he worships the ground you tread on. You don't deserve it, but he 

does. Or at least he did the day before yesterday. And here you are!" 

 

Her aunt opened all the fingers of her gloved hand in a rhetorical 

gesture. "It seems to me all madness--madness! Just because your 

father--wouldn't let you disobey him!" 

 

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

In the afternoon the task of expostulation was taken up by Mr. Stanley 

in person. Her father's ideas of expostulation were a little harsh and 

forcible, and over the claret-colored table-cloth and under the gas 

chandelier, with his hat and umbrella between them like the mace in 

Parliament, he and his daughter contrived to have a violent quarrel. She 


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