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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

dingy, and the arm-chair and the seats of the other chairs were covered 

with the unusual brightness of a large-patterned chintz, which also 

supplied the window-curtain. There was a round table covered, not with 

the usual "tapestry" cover, but with a plain green cloth that went 

passably with the wall-paper. In the recess beside the fireplace 

were some open bookshelves. The carpet was a quiet drugget and not 

excessively worn, and the bed in the corner was covered by a white 

quilt. There were neither texts nor rubbish on the walls, but only a 

stirring version of Belshazzar's feast, a steel engraving in the early 

Victorian manner that had some satisfactory blacks. And the woman who 

showed this room was tall, with an understanding eye and the quiet 

manner of the well-trained servant. 

 

Ann Veronica brought her luggage in a cab from the hotel; she tipped the 

hotel porter sixpence and overpaid the cabman eighteenpence, unpacked 

some of her books and possessions, and so made the room a little 

homelike, and then sat down in a by no means uncomfortable arm-chair 

before the fire. She had arranged for a supper of tea, a boiled egg, and 

some tinned peaches. She had discussed the general question of supplies 

with the helpful landlady. "And now," said Ann Veronica surveying her 

apartment with an unprecedented sense of proprietorship, "what is the 

next step?" 

 

She spent the evening in writing--it was a little difficult--to her 

father and--which was easier--to the Widgetts. She was greatly heartened 

by doing this. The necessity of defending herself and assuming a 

confident and secure tone did much to dispell the sense of being 

exposed and indefensible in a huge dingy world that abounded in sinister 

possibilities. She addressed her letters, meditated on them for a time, 

and then took them out and posted them. Afterward she wanted to get her 

letter to her father back in order to read it over again, and, if it 

tallied with her general impression of it, re-write it. 

 

He would know her address to-morrow. She reflected upon that with a 

thrill of terror that was also, somehow, in some faint remote way, 

gleeful. 

 

"Dear old Daddy," she said, "he'll make a fearful fuss. Well, it had to 

happen somewhen.... Somehow. I wonder what he'll say?" 

 

 


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