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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

women's bodies. The windows of these rooms were obscured with draperies, 

their floors a carpet patchwork; the china ornaments on their mantels 

were of a class apart. After the first onset several of the women who 

had apartments to let said she would not do for them, and in effect 

dismissed her. This also struck her as odd. 

 

About many of these houses hung a mysterious taint as of something 

weakly and commonly and dustily evil; the women who negotiated the rooms 

looked out through a friendly manner as though it was a mask, with hard, 

defiant eyes. Then one old crone, short-sighted and shaky-handed, called 

Ann Veronica "dearie," and made some remark, obscure and slangy, of 

which the spirit rather than the words penetrated to her understanding. 

 

For a time she looked at no more apartments, and walked through 

gaunt and ill-cleaned streets, through the sordid under side of life, 

perplexed and troubled, ashamed of her previous obtuseness. 

 

She had something of the feeling a Hindoo must experience who has been 

into surroundings or touched something that offends his caste. She 

passed people in the streets and regarded them with a quickening 

apprehension, once or twice came girls dressed in slatternly finery, 

going toward Regent Street from out these places. It did not occur to 

her that they at least had found a way of earning a living, and had that 

much economic superiority to herself. It did not occur to her that save 

for some accidents of education and character they had souls like her 

own. 

 

For a time Ann Veronica went on her way gauging the quality of sordid 

streets. At last, a little way to the northward of Euston Road, the 

moral cloud seemed to lift, the moral atmosphere to change; clean blinds 

appeared in the windows, clean doorsteps before the doors, a different 

appeal in the neatly placed cards bearing the word 

 

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| APARTMENTS | 

-------------------------- 

 

in the clear bright windows. At last in a street near the Hampstead Road 

she hit upon a room that had an exceptional quality of space and order, 

and a tall woman with a kindly face to show it. "You're a student, 

perhaps?" said the tall woman. "At the Tredgold Women's College," said 

Ann Veronica. She felt it would save explanations if she did not state 

she had left her home and was looking for employment. The room was 

papered with green, large-patterned paper that was at worst a trifle 


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