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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

done--I wonder? You may, perhaps, think I have done it just in a fit of 

childish petulance because my father locked me in when I wanted to go 

to a ball of which he did not approve. But really it is much more 

than that. At Morningside Park I feel as though all my growing up was 

presently to stop, as though I was being shut in from the light of life, 

and, as they say in botany, etiolated. I was just like a sort of dummy 

that does things as it is told--that is to say, as the strings are 

pulled. I want to be a person by myself, and to pull my own strings. I 

had rather have trouble and hardship like that than be taken care of by 

others. I want to be myself. I wonder if a man can quite understand that 

passionate feeling? It is quite a passionate feeling. So I am already 

no longer the girl you knew at Morningside Park. I am a young person 

seeking employment and freedom and self-development, just as in quite 

our first talk of all I said I wanted to be. 

 

"I do hope you will see how things are, and not be offended with me or 

frightfully shocked and distressed by what I have done. 

 

"Very sincerely yours, 

 

"ANN VERONICA STANLEY." 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 6 

 

 

In the afternoon she resumed her search for apartments. The intoxicating 

sense of novelty had given place to a more business-like mood. She 

drifted northward from the Strand, and came on some queer and dingy 

quarters. 

 

She had never imagined life was half so sinister as it looked to her in 

the beginning of these investigations. She found herself again in the 

presence of some element in life about which she had been trained not 

to think, about which she was perhaps instinctively indisposed to think; 

something which jarred, in spite of all her mental resistance, with 

all her preconceptions of a clean and courageous girl walking out from 

Morningside Park as one walks out of a cell into a free and spacious 

world. One or two landladies refused her with an air of conscious virtue 

that she found hard to explain. "We don't let to ladies," they said. 

 

She drifted, via Theobald's Road, obliquely toward the region about 

Titchfield Street. Such apartments as she saw were either scandalously 

dirty or unaccountably dear, or both. And some were adorned with 

engravings that struck her as being more vulgar and undesirable than 

anything she had ever seen in her life. Ann Veronica loved beautiful 

things, and the beauty of undraped loveliness not least among them; but 

these were pictures that did but insist coarsely upon the roundness of 


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