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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

there were not so many suitable advertisements as she had expected. 

She sat down by the paper-rack with a general feeling of resemblance 

to Vivie Warren, and looked through the Morning Post and Standard and 

Telegraph, and afterward the half-penny sheets. The Morning Post was 

hungry for governesses and nursery governesses, but held out no other 

hopes; the Daily Telegraph that morning seemed eager only for skirt 

hands. She went to a writing-desk and made some memoranda on a sheet of 

note-paper, and then remembered that she had no address as yet to which 

letters could be sent. 

 

She decided to leave this matter until the morrow and devote the morning 

to settling up with Mr. Manning. At the cost of quite a number of torn 

drafts she succeeded in evolving this: 

 

"DEAR MR. MANNING,--I find it very difficult to answer your letter. 

I hope you won't mind if I say first that I think it does me an 

extraordinary honor that you should think of any one like myself 

so highly and seriously, and, secondly, that I wish it had not been 

written." 

 

She surveyed this sentence for some time before going on. "I wonder," 

she said, "why one writes him sentences like that? It'll have to go," 

she decided, "I've written too many already." She went on, with a 

desperate attempt to be easy and colloquial: 

 

"You see, we were rather good friends, I thought, and now perhaps it 

will be difficult for us to get back to the old friendly footing. But if 

that can possibly be done I want it to be done. You see, the plain fact 

of the case is that I think I am too young and ignorant for marriage. 

I have been thinking these things over lately, and it seems to me that 

marriage for a girl is just the supremest thing in life. It isn't just 

one among a number of important things; for her it is the important 

thing, and until she knows far more than I know of the facts of life, 

how is she to undertake it? So please; if you will, forget that you 

wrote that letter, and forgive this answer. I want you to think of me 

just as if I was a man, and quite outside marriage altogether. 

 

"I do hope you will be able to do this, because I value men friends. 

I shall be very sorry if I cannot have you for a friend. I think that 

there is no better friend for a girl than a man rather older than 

herself. 

 

"Perhaps by this time you will have heard of the step I have taken in 

leaving my home. Very likely you will disapprove highly of what I have 


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