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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

She was glad to join in the stream of hurrying homeward workers that was 

now welling out of a thousand places of employment, and to imitate their 

driven, preoccupied haste. She had followed a bobbing white hat and gray 

jacket until she reached the Euston Road corner of Tottenham Court Road, 

and there, by the name on a bus and the cries of a conductor, she made 

a guess of her way. And she did not merely affect to be driven--she felt 

driven. She was afraid people would follow her, she was afraid of the 

dark, open doorways she passed, and afraid of the blazes of light; she 

was afraid to be alone, and she knew not what it was she feared. 

 

It was past seven when she got back to her hotel. She thought then that 

she had shaken off the man of the bulging blue eyes forever, but that 

night she found he followed her into her dreams. He stalked her, he 

stared at her, he craved her, he sidled slinking and propitiatory 

and yet relentlessly toward her, until at last she awoke from the 

suffocating nightmare nearness of his approach, and lay awake in fear 

and horror listening to the unaccustomed sounds of the hotel. 

 

She came very near that night to resolving that she would return to 

her home next morning. But the morning brought courage again, and those 

first intimations of horror vanished completely from her mind. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 5 

 

 

She had sent her father a telegram from the East Strand post-office 

worded thus: 

 

| All | is | well | with | me | 

|---------|-----------|----------|----------|---------| 

| and | quite | safe | Veronica | | 

----------------------------------------------------- 

 

and afterward she had dined a la carte upon a cutlet, and had then set 

herself to write an answer to Mr. Manning's proposal of marriage. But 

she had found it very difficult. 

 

 

"DEAR MR. MANNING," she had begun. So far it had been plain sailing, 

and it had seemed fairly evident to go on: "I find it very difficult to 

answer your letter." 

 

But after that neither ideas nor phrases had come and she had fallen 

thinking of the events of the day. She had decided that she would spend 

the next morning answering advertisements in the papers that abounded in 

the writing-room; and so, after half an hour's perusal of back numbers 

of the Sketch in the drawing-room, she had gone to bed. 

 

She found next morning, when she came to this advertisement answering, 

that it was more difficult than she had supposed. In the first place 


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