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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

and again stroked his small mustache and coughed a self-conscious cough. 

 

"That he should be in the same world with me!" said Ann Veronica, 

reduced to reading the list of good things the British Tea-Table Company 

had priced for its patrons. 

 

Heaven knows what dim and tawdry conceptions of passion and desire were 

in that blond cranium, what romance-begotten dreams of intrigue and 

adventure! but they sufficed, when presently Ann Veronica went out 

into the darkling street again, to inspire a flitting, dogged pursuit, 

idiotic, exasperating, indecent. 

 

She had no idea what she should do. If she spoke to a policeman she did 

not know what would ensue. Perhaps she would have to charge this man and 

appear in a police-court next day. 

 

She became angry with herself. She would not be driven in by this 

persistent, sneaking aggression. She would ignore him. Surely she could 

ignore him. She stopped abruptly, and looked in a flower-shop window. He 

passed, and came loitering back and stood beside her, silently looking 

into her face. 

 

The afternoon had passed now into twilight. The shops were lighting 

up into gigantic lanterns of color, the street lamps were glowing 

into existence, and she had lost her way. She had lost her sense of 

direction, and was among unfamiliar streets. She went on from street to 

street, and all the glory of London had departed. Against the sinister, 

the threatening, monstrous inhumanity of the limitless city, there was 

nothing now but this supreme, ugly fact of a pursuit--the pursuit of the 

undesired, persistent male. 

 

For a second time Ann Veronica wanted to swear at the universe. 

 

There were moments when she thought of turning upon this man and 

talking to him. But there was something in his face at once stupid and 

invincible that told her he would go on forcing himself upon her, that 

he would esteem speech with her a great point gained. In the twilight 

he had ceased to be a person one could tackle and shame; he had become 

something more general, a something that crawled and sneaked toward her 

and would not let her alone.... 

 

Then, when the tension was getting unendurable, and she was on the verge 

of speaking to some casual passer-by and demanding help, her follower 

vanished. For a time she could scarcely believe he was gone. He had. The 

night had swallowed him up, but his work on her was done. She had lost 

her nerve, and there was no more freedom in London for her that night. 


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