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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

the fluttering assurance of some tall ship. Then as she drew nearer 

paint showed upon her face, and a harsh purpose behind the quiet 

expression of her open countenance, and a sort of unreality in her 

splendor betrayed itself for which Ann Veronica could not recall the 

right word--a word, half understood, that lurked and hid in her mind, 

the word "meretricious." Behind this woman and a little to the side 

of her, walked a man smartly dressed, with desire and appraisal in his 

eyes. Something insisted that those two were mysteriously linked--that 

the woman knew the man was there. 

 

It was a second reminder that against her claim to go free and 

untrammelled there was a case to be made, that after all it was true 

that a girl does not go alone in the world unchallenged, nor ever has 

gone freely alone in the world, that evil walks abroad and dangers, and 

petty insults more irritating than dangers, lurk. 

 

It was in the quiet streets and squares toward Oxford Street that 

it first came into her head disagreeably that she herself was being 

followed. She observed a man walking on the opposite side of the way and 

looking toward her. 

 

"Bother it all!" she swore. "Bother!" and decided that this was not so, 

and would not look to right or left again. 

 

Beyond the Circus Ann Veronica went into a British Tea-Table Company 

shop to get some tea. And as she was yet waiting for her tea to come she 

saw this man again. Either it was an unfortunate recovery of a trail, or 

he had followed her from Mayfair. There was no mistaking his intentions 

this time. He came down the shop looking for her quite obviously, and 

took up a position on the other side against a mirror in which he was 

able to regard her steadfastly. 

 

Beneath the serene unconcern of Ann Veronica's face was a boiling 

tumult. She was furiously angry. She gazed with a quiet detachment 

toward the window and the Oxford Street traffic, and in her heart she 

was busy kicking this man to death. He HAD followed her! What had he 

followed her for? He must have followed her all the way from beyond 

Grosvenor Square. 

 

He was a tall man and fair, with bluish eyes that were rather 

protuberant, and long white hands of which he made a display. He had 

removed his silk hat, and now sat looking at Ann Veronica over an 

untouched cup of tea; he sat gloating upon her, trying to catch her eye. 

Once, when he thought he had done so, he smiled an ingratiating smile. 

He moved, after quiet intervals, with a quick little movement, and ever 


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