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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

But presently, as she sat on the one antimacassared red silk chair 

and surveyed her hold-all and bag in that tidy, rather vacant, and 

dehumanized apartment, with its empty wardrobe and desert toilet-table 

and pictureless walls and stereotyped furnishings, a sudden blankness 

came upon her as though she didn't matter, and had been thrust away into 

this impersonal corner, she and her gear.... 

 

She decided to go out into the London afternoon again and get something 

to eat in an Aerated Bread shop or some such place, and perhaps find a 

cheap room for herself. Of course that was what she had to do; she had 

to find a cheap room for herself and work! 

 

This Room No. 47 was no more than a sort of railway compartment on the 

way to that. 

 

How does one get work? 

 

She walked along the Strand and across Trafalgar Square, and by the 

Haymarket to Piccadilly, and so through dignified squares and palatial 

alleys to Oxford Street; and her mind was divided between a speculative 

treatment of employment on the one hand, and breezes--zephyr breezes--of 

the keenest appreciation for London, on the other. The jolly part of it 

was that for the first time in her life so far as London was concerned, 

she was not going anywhere in particular; for the first time in her life 

it seemed to her she was taking London in. 

 

She tried to think how people get work. Ought she to walk into some 

of these places and tell them what she could do? She hesitated at the 

window of a shipping-office in Cockspur Street and at the Army and 

Navy Stores, but decided that perhaps there would be some special and 

customary hour, and that it would be better for her to find this out 

before she made her attempt. And, besides, she didn't just immediately 

want to make her attempt. 

 

She fell into a pleasant dream of positions and work. Behind every one 

of these myriad fronts she passed there must be a career or careers. Her 

ideas of women's employment and a modern woman's pose in life were based 

largely on the figure of Vivie Warren in Mrs. Warren's Profession. She 

had seen Mrs. Warren's Profession furtively with Hetty Widgett from the 

gallery of a Stage Society performance one Monday afternoon. Most of 

it had been incomprehensible to her, or comprehensible in a way that 

checked further curiosity, but the figure of Vivien, hard, capable, 

successful, and bullying, and ordering about a veritable Teddy in the 

person of Frank Gardner, appealed to her. She saw herself in very much 


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