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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

the bridge seemed ripe and good in her eyes. A traffic of copious barges 

slumbered over the face of the river-barges either altogether stagnant 

or dreaming along in the wake of fussy tugs; and above circled, urbanely 

voracious, the London seagulls. She had never been there before at that 

hour, in that light, and it seemed to her as if she came to it all for 

the first time. And this great mellow place, this London, now was hers, 

to struggle with, to go where she pleased in, to overcome and live in. 

"I am glad," she told herself, "I came." 

 

She marked an hotel that seemed neither opulent nor odd in a little side 

street opening on the Embankment, made up her mind with an effort, and, 

returning by Hungerford Bridge to Waterloo, took a cab to this chosen 

refuge with her two pieces of luggage. There was just a minute's 

hesitation before they gave her a room. 

 

The young lady in the bureau said she would inquire, and Ann Veronica, 

while she affected to read the appeal on a hospital collecting-box upon 

the bureau counter, had a disagreeable sense of being surveyed from 

behind by a small, whiskered gentleman in a frock-coat, who came out of 

the inner office and into the hall among a number of equally observant 

green porters to look at her and her bags. But the survey was 

satisfactory, and she found herself presently in Room No. 47, 

straightening her hat and waiting for her luggage to appear. 

 

"All right so far," she said to herself.... 

 

 

 


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