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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

portmanteau. Can you lend me some stuff?" 

 

"You ARE a chap!" said Constance, and warmed only slowly from the idea 

of dissuasion to the idea of help. But they did what they could for her. 

They agreed to lend her their hold-all and a large, formless bag which 

they called the communal trunk. And Teddy declared himself ready to go 

to the ends of the earth for her, and carry her luggage all the way. 

 

Hetty, looking out of the window--she always smoked her after-breakfast 

cigarette at the window for the benefit of the less advanced section of 

Morningside Park society--and trying not to raise objections, saw Miss 

Stanley going down toward the shops. 

 

"If you must go on with it," said Hetty, "now's your time." And Ann 

Veronica at once went back with the hold-all, trying not to hurry 

indecently but to keep up her dignified air of being a wronged person 

doing the right thing at a smart trot, to pack. Teddy went round by the 

garden backs and dropped the bag over the fence. All this was exciting 

and entertaining. Her aunt returned before the packing was done, and 

Ann Veronica lunched with an uneasy sense of bag and hold-all packed 

up-stairs and inadequately hidden from chance intruders by the valance 

of the bed. She went down, flushed and light-hearted, to the Widgetts' 

after lunch to make some final arrangements and then, as soon as her 

aunt had retired to lie down for her usual digestive hour, took the 

risk of the servants having the enterprise to report her proceedings 

and carried her bag and hold-all to the garden gate, whence Teddy, in 

a state of ecstatic service, bore them to the railway station. Then she 

went up-stairs again, dressed herself carefully for town, put on her 

most businesslike-looking hat, and with a wave of emotion she found it 

hard to control, walked down to catch the 3.17 up-train. 

 

Teddy handed her into the second-class compartment her season-ticket 

warranted, and declared she was "simply splendid." "If you want 

anything," he said, "or get into any trouble, wire me. I'd come back 

from the ends of the earth. I'd do anything, Vee. It's horrible to think 

of you!" 

 

"You're an awful brick, Teddy!" she said. 

 

"Who wouldn't be for you?" 

 

The train began to move. "You're splendid!" said Teddy, with his hair 

wild in the wind. "Good luck! Good luck!" 

 

She waved from the window until the bend hid him. 

 

She found herself alone in the train asking herself what she must do 


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