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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

waiting for her round the corner. She tried to imagine herself "getting 

something," to project herself as sitting down at a desk and writing, 

or as returning after her work to some pleasantly equipped and free and 

independent flat. For a time she furnished the flat. But even with 

that furniture it remained extremely vague, the possible good and the 

possible evil as well! 

 

The possible evil! "I'll go," said Ann Veronica for the hundredth time. 

"I'll go. I don't care WHAT happens." 

 

She awoke out of a doze, as though she had never been sleeping. It was 

time to get up. 

 

She sat on the edge of her bed and looked about her, at her room, at the 

row of black-covered books and the pig's skull. "I must take them," 

she said, to help herself over her own incredulity. "How shall I get my 

luggage out of the house?..." 

 

The figure of her aunt, a little distant, a little propitiatory, behind 

the coffee things, filled her with a sense of almost catastrophic 

adventure. Perhaps she might never come back to that breakfast-room 

again. Never! Perhaps some day, quite soon, she might regret that 

breakfast-room. She helped herself to the remainder of the slightly 

congealed bacon, and reverted to the problem of getting her luggage 

out of the house. She decided to call in the help of Teddy Widgett, or, 

failing him, of one of his sisters. 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

She found the younger generation of the Widgetts engaged in languid 

reminiscences, and all, as they expressed it, a "bit decayed." Every 

one became tremendously animated when they heard that Ann Veronica had 

failed them because she had been, as she expressed it, "locked in." 

 

"My God!" said Teddy, more impressively than ever. 

 

"But what are you going to do?" asked Hetty. 

 

"What can one do?" asked Ann Veronica. "Would you stand it? I'm going to 

clear out." 

 

"Clear out?" cried Hetty. 

 

"Go to London," said Ann Veronica. 

 

She had expected sympathetic admiration, but instead the whole Widgett 

family, except Teddy, expressed a common dismay. "But how can you?" 

asked Constance. "Who will you stop with?" 

 

"I shall go on my own. Take a room!" 

 

"I say!" said Constance. "But who's going to pay for the room?" 

 

"I've got money," said Ann Veronica. "Anything is better than this--this 

stifled life down here." And seeing that Hetty and Constance were 

obviously developing objections, she plunged at once into a demand for 

help. "I've got nothing in the world to pack with except a toy size 


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