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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

CHAPTER THE FIFTH 

 

THE FLIGHT TO LONDON 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

Ann Veronica had an impression that she did not sleep at all that night, 

and at any rate she got through an immense amount of feverish feeling 

and thinking. 

 

What was she going to do? 

 

One main idea possessed her: she must get away from home, she must 

assert herself at once or perish. "Very well," she would say, "then I 

must go." To remain, she felt, was to concede everything. And she would 

have to go to-morrow. It was clear it must be to-morrow. If she delayed 

a day she would delay two days, if she delayed two days she would delay 

a week, and after a week things would be adjusted to submission forever. 

"I'll go," she vowed to the night, "or I'll die!" She made plans and 

estimated means and resources. These and her general preparations had 

perhaps a certain disproportion. She had a gold watch, a very good gold 

watch that had been her mother's, a pearl necklace that was also pretty 

good, some unpretending rings, some silver bangles and a few other such 

inferior trinkets, three pounds thirteen shillings unspent of her 

dress and book allowance and a few good salable books. So equipped, she 

proposed to set up a separate establishment in the world. 

 

And then she would find work. 

 

For most of a long and fluctuating night she was fairly confident that 

she would find work; she knew herself to be strong, intelligent, and 

capable by the standards of most of the girls she knew. She was not 

quite clear how she should find it, but she felt she would. Then 

she would write and tell her father what she had done, and put their 

relationship on a new footing. 

 

That was how she projected it, and in general terms it seemed plausible 

and possible. But in between these wider phases of comparative 

confidence were gaps of disconcerting doubt, when the universe was 

presented as making sinister and threatening faces at her, defying her 

to defy, preparing a humiliating and shameful overthrow. "I don't care," 

said Ann Veronica to the darkness; "I'll fight it." 

 

She tried to plan her proceedings in detail. The only difficulties that 

presented themselves clearly to her were the difficulties of getting 

away from Morningside Park, and not the difficulties at the other end 

of the journey. These were so outside her experience that she found it 

possible to thrust them almost out of sight by saying they would be "all 

right" in confident tones to herself. But still she knew they were not 

right, and at times they became a horrible obsession as of something 


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