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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

who lived three gardens away, and who had been mowing his lawn to get 

an appetite for dinner, standing in a fascinated attitude beside the 

forgotten lawn-mower and watching her intently. 

 

She found it extremely difficult to infuse an air of quiet correctitude 

into her return through the window, and when she was safely inside she 

waved clinched fists and executed a noiseless dance of rage. 

 

When she reflected that Mr. Pragmar probably knew Mr. Ramage, and might 

describe the affair to him, she cried "Oh!" with renewed vexation, and 

repeated some steps of her dance in a new and more ecstatic measure. 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

At eight that evening Miss Stanley tapped at Ann Veronica's bedroom 

door. 

 

"I've brought you up some dinner, Vee," she said. 

 

Ann Veronica was lying on her bed in a darkling room staring at the 

ceiling. She reflected before answering. She was frightfully hungry. 

She had eaten little or no tea, and her mid-day meal had been worse than 

nothing. 

 

She got up and unlocked the door. 

 

Her aunt did not object to capital punishment or war, or the industrial 

system or casual wards, or flogging of criminals or the Congo Free 

State, because none of these things really got hold of her imagination; 

but she did object, she did not like, she could not bear to think of 

people not having and enjoying their meals. It was her distinctive test 

of an emotional state, its interference with a kindly normal digestion. 

Any one very badly moved choked down a few mouthfuls; the symptom of 

supreme distress was not to be able to touch a bit. So that the thought 

of Ann Veronica up-stairs had been extremely painful for her through all 

the silent dinner-time that night. As soon as dinner was over she went 

into the kitchen and devoted herself to compiling a tray--not a tray 

merely of half-cooled dinner things, but a specially prepared "nice" 

tray, suitable for tempting any one. With this she now entered. 

 

Ann Veronica found herself in the presence of the most disconcerting 

fact in human experience, the kindliness of people you believe to be 

thoroughly wrong. She took the tray with both hands, gulped, and gave 

way to tears. 

 

Her aunt leaped unhappily to the thought of penitence. 

 

"My dear," she began, with an affectionate hand on Ann Veronica's 

shoulder, "I do SO wish you would realize how it grieves your father." 

 

Ann Veronica flung away from her hand, and the pepper-pot on the tray 

upset, sending a puff of pepper into the air and instantly filling them 


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