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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

CHAPTER THE FOURTH 

 

THE CRISIS 

 

 

Part 1 

 

 

We left Miss Stanley with Ann Veronica's fancy dress in her hands and 

her eyes directed to Ann Veronica's pseudo-Turkish slippers. 

 

When Mr. Stanley came home at a quarter to six--an earlier train by 

fifteen minutes than he affected--his sister met him in the hall with 

a hushed expression. "I'm so glad you're here, Peter," she said. "She 

means to go." 

 

"Go!" he said. "Where?" 

 

"To that ball." 

 

"What ball?" The question was rhetorical. He knew. 

 

"I believe she's dressing up-stairs--now." 

 

"Then tell her to undress, confound her!" The City had been thoroughly 

annoying that day, and he was angry from the outset. 

 

Miss Stanley reflected on this proposal for a moment. 

 

"I don't think she will," she said. 

 

"She must," said Mr. Stanley, and went into his study. His sister 

followed. "She can't go now. She'll have to wait for dinner," he said, 

uncomfortably. 

 

"She's going to have some sort of meal with the Widgetts down the 

Avenue, and go up with them. 

 

"She told you that?" 

 

"Yes." 

 

"When?" 

 

"At tea." 

 

"But why didn't you prohibit once for all the whole thing? How dared she 

tell you that?" 

 

"Out of defiance. She just sat and told me that was her arrangement. 

I've never seen her quite so sure of herself." 

 

"What did you say?" 

 

"I said, 'My dear Veronica! how can you think of such things?'" 

 

"And then?" 

 

"She had two more cups of tea and some cake, and told me of her walk." 

 

"She'll meet somebody one of these days--walking about like that." 

 

"She didn't say she'd met any one." 

 

"But didn't you say some more about that ball?" 

 

"I said everything I could say as soon as I realized she was trying to 

avoid the topic. I said, 'It is no use your telling me about this walk 

and pretend I've been told about the ball, because you haven't. Your 

father has forbidden you to go!'" 

 

"Well?" 

 

"She said, 'I hate being horrid to you and father, but I feel it my duty 

to go to that ball!'" 

 

"Felt it her duty!" 

 

"'Very well,' I said, 'then I wash my hands of the whole business. Your 

disobedience be upon your own head.'" 

 

"But that is flat rebellion!" said Mr. Stanley, standing on the 

hearthrug with his back to the unlit gas-fire. "You ought at once--you 

ought at once to have told her that. What duty does a girl owe to any 

one before her father? Obedience to him, that is surely the first law. 

What CAN she put before that?" His voice began to rise. "One would think 


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