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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

the High School to the Fadden Art School and a bright, eventful life of 

art student dances, Socialist meetings, theatre galleries, talking about 

work, and even, at intervals, work; and ever and again they drew Ann 

Veronica from her sound persistent industry into the circle of these 

experiences. They had asked her to come to the first of the two great 

annual Fadden Dances, the October one, and Ann Veronica had accepted 

with enthusiasm. And now her father said she must not go. 

 

He had "put his foot down," and said she must not go. 

 

Going involved two things that all Ann Veronica's tact had been 

ineffectual to conceal from her aunt and father. Her usual dignified 

reserve had availed her nothing. One point was that she was to wear 

fancy dress in the likeness of a Corsair's bride, and the other was that 

she was to spend whatever vestiges of the night remained after the dance 

was over in London with the Widgett girls and a select party in "quite a 

decent little hotel" near Fitzroy Square. 

 

"But, my dear!" said Ann Veronica's aunt. 

 

"You see," said Ann Veronica, with the air of one who shares a 

difficulty, "I've promised to go. I didn't realize--I don't see how I 

can get out of it now." 

 

Then it was her father issued his ultimatum. He had conveyed it to her, 

not verbally, but by means of a letter, which seemed to her a singularly 

ignoble method of prohibition. "He couldn't look me in the face and say 

it," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"But of course it's aunt's doing really." 

 

And thus it was that as Ann Veronica neared the gates of home, she said 

to herself: "I'll have it out with him somehow. I'll have it out with 

him. And if he won't--" 

 

But she did not give even unspoken words to the alternative at that 

time. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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