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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

because of her aunt's censorship, she took to smuggling any books she 

thought might be prohibited instead of bringing them home openly, and 

she went to the theatre whenever she could produce an acceptable friend 

to accompany her. She passed her general science examination with double 

honors and specialized in science. She happened to have an acute sense 

of form and unusual mental lucidity, and she found in biology, and 

particularly in comparative anatomy, a very considerable interest, 

albeit the illumination it cast upon her personal life was not 

altogether direct. She dissected well, and in a year she found herself 

chafing at the limitations of the lady B. Sc. who retailed a store of 

faded learning in the Tredgold laboratory. She had already realized that 

this instructress was hopelessly wrong and foggy--it is the test of the 

good comparative anatomist--upon the skull. She discovered a desire to 

enter as a student in the Imperial College at Westminster, where Russell 

taught, and go on with her work at the fountain-head. 

 

She had asked about that already, and her father had replied, evasively: 

"We'll have to see about that, little Vee; we'll have to see about 

that." In that posture of being seen about the matter hung until she 

seemed committed to another session at the Tredgold College, and in the 

mean time a small conflict arose and brought the latch-key question, and 

in fact the question of Ann Veronica's position generally, to an acute 

issue. 

 

In addition to the various business men, solicitors, civil servants, 

and widow ladies who lived in the Morningside Park Avenue, there was a 

certain family of alien sympathies and artistic quality, the Widgetts, 

with which Ann Veronica had become very friendly. Mr. Widgett was a 

journalist and art critic, addicted to a greenish-gray tweed suit 

and "art" brown ties; he smoked corncob pipes in the Avenue on Sunday 

morning, travelled third class to London by unusual trains, and openly 

despised golf. He occupied one of the smaller houses near the station. 

He had one son, who had been co-educated, and three daughters with 

peculiarly jolly red hair that Ann Veronica found adorable. Two of these 

had been her particular intimates at the High School, and had done much 

to send her mind exploring beyond the limits of the available literature 

at home. It was a cheerful, irresponsible, shamelessly hard-up family in 

the key of faded green and flattened purple, and the girls went on from 


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