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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

giving her lessons to learn and games to play and interests of the most 

suitable and various kinds. Presently she woke up to the fact that there 

was a considerable group of interests called being in love and getting 

married, with certain attractive and amusing subsidiary developments, 

such as flirtation and "being interested" in people of the opposite sex. 

She approached this field with her usual liveliness of apprehension. But 

here she met with a check. These interests her world promptly, through 

the agency of schoolmistresses, older school-mates, her aunt, and a 

number of other responsible and authoritative people, assured her she 

must on no account think about. Miss Moffatt, the history and moral 

instruction mistress, was particularly explicit upon this score, and 

they all agreed in indicating contempt and pity for girls whose minds 

ran on such matters, and who betrayed it in their conversation or dress 

or bearing. It was, in fact, a group of interests quite unlike any 

other group, peculiar and special, and one to be thoroughly ashamed of. 

Nevertheless, Ann Veronica found it a difficult matter not to think of 

these things. However having a considerable amount of pride, she decided 

she would disavow these undesirable topics and keep her mind away from 

them just as far as she could, but it left her at the end of her school 

days with that wrapped feeling I have described, and rather at loose 

ends. 

 

The world, she discovered, with these matters barred had no particular 

place for her at all, nothing for her to do, except a functionless 

existence varied by calls, tennis, selected novels, walks, and dusting 

in her father's house. She thought study would be better. She was a 

clever girl, the best of her year in the High School, and she made 

a valiant fight for Somerville or Newnham but her father had met and 

argued with a Somerville girl at a friend's dinner-table and he thought 

that sort of thing unsexed a woman. He said simply that he wanted her to 

live at home. There was a certain amount of disputation, and meanwhile 

she went on at school. They compromised at length on the science course 

at the Tredgold Women's College--she had already matriculated into 

London University from school--she came of age, and she bickered with 

her aunt for latch-key privileges on the strength of that and her season 

ticket. Shamefaced curiosities began to come back into her mind, thinly 

disguised as literature and art. She read voraciously, and presently, 


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